Traveling the World While Maintaining Your GAINS! – Part 1

Traveling the World While Maintaining Your GAINS! – Part 1

While traveling, especially to areas that may not have the best food selection or availability to gyms or places to workout, it can be challenging to try to stay on track with your normal diet, training, and healthy lifestyle. But just because these challenges are there does not mean that you cannot prepare for your travels in a way that will help keep you on track with your nutrition and training goals. It is important, just like with the mentality you should have with dieting and your nutrition, to not fall into the all or nothing mentality while traveling. What I am referring to here is getting into the mentality of that if you cannot commit to your daily routine completely with your normal diet and training regiment, then you should not try at all. This is the kind of mentality and mindset that results in yoyo-dieting and also yoyo-training regiments where you train hard for a short period of time, fall off track and then accept that as failure. Just because you cannot execute your plan perfectly, does not mean you should not try to execute it as best you can in your given circumstances.

Let’s start with your nutrition.
One of the great parts about traveling is soaking yourself in the new and exciting culture of where you are visiting, and a huge part of that surrounds food. The new tastes, the new smells, food choices, and selection you have never heard of or tried, it can be very exciting and you should not restrict yourself from this or let your diet get in the way of getting the most from your travels. The key to staying on track as best you can comes down to portion control and moderation. By following some simple guidelines, you can cut your weight gain from your vacation in half or greater, if not completely stay on track with your weight and body composition while still being able to enjoy your food choices and your vacation.
Here are my 5 tips to help you stay on track with your nutrition when traveling and all while still being able to enjoy some of your favorite food choices.
1. Prepare for the trip! I recommend that you bring some protein sources with you on your trip like protein powders, protein bars, jerky (and toothpicks) and or tuna to help hit your protein target. Often when traveling to certain parts of the world, solid protein sources are far and few between and when you can find a good source, it is often covered in oil, butter or a high calorie sauce. Bringing protein with you will help you get closer to your recommended daily intake from your coach, keep you fuller longer and help maintain your precious muscle mass you have worked so hard to get!
2. Portion control! There will be caloric dense foods and you should enjoy them, the key is always portion control and eating in moderation. Have a small bite, enjoy it, split it with someone else and never be afraid to leave some food on your plate.
3. Focus on protein and nutrient dense food items FIRST! When you are eating, always try to fill up with protein, fiber and nutrient-dense foods first, then enjoy the snacks with proper portion control. Focusing on protein and fiber dense foods first will help you stay fuller, longer and will ultimately reduce the total calories you are consuming.
4. Avoid excessive alcohol intake! One drink per day is not going to kill you, but having 5+ will not do good things to the progress you have made. Try to have a glass of water before and after every alcoholic beverage, this will control water retention and help you drink in moderation by keeping you fuller.
5. Best for last, always stop eating when you are 90% full! This one is simple if you start to get full, stop eating. Your body is telling you it has had enough calories, listen to it.

In the next post, we will go over how to stay on track with your training, even when gyms are not readily available.

Written By Hybrid Nutrition Coach Greg Sutton

WOMEN, THE SCALE IS NOT YOUR FRIEND

WOMEN, THE SCALE IS NOT YOUR FRIEND

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Women should focus on body composition progress rather than the number on the scale.

As many of my clients know, I do not care about the number on the scale. I do not care with myself and if my client does not have a strict body weight that they need to be for a weight class or competition then I do not care about theirs either! With most clients I use their daily body weight as a means to measure where they are at with their energy balance.

 

If they gain weight too fast then I know to lower total caloric intake, if losing too fast then I increase calories. But why do women often have issues losing WEIGHT but still see great improvements to body composition? Women retain muscle mass better than men when in a caloric deficit, so when women are losing weight they are more likely to keep their muscle mass when compared to men. When most female clients start with me I dramatically increase their protein intake that they were having before, therefore increasing muscle protein synthesis. Add resistance training into the picture and now we have a perfect environment for muscle gain! WHICH IS AMAZING! But often female clients can be discouraged by the lack of weight drop thinking that is the only measure of progress.

 

Look at your photos! Clients who focus a lot on the scale, do you really care about the number on the scale OR are you trying to get to that body weight because you have a picture in your head of what you will look like at that weight? If the latter, then you actually only care about body composition improvements. Being lighter does not make you healthy, having lower body fat %, increased muscle mass, improved strength, endurance, active lifestyle, eating a healthy and balanced diet, all these things make you healthy. Focus your attention on what really matters, your health.
By: Hybrid Nutrition coach @greg.sut

BENCH PLATEAU? TRY CHANGING YOUR BAR PATH

BENCH PLATEAU? TRY CHANGING YOUR BAR PATH

 

After reading McLaughlin’s book, which is probably one of the best resources out there for the bench press I have ever encountered, I ran across one of Greg Nuckols article, where he talks about some key points from this book. He does a great job going over the biomechanics of the bench a lot more in depth than I will cover in this short post so if that is something that interests you I highly recommend you check out his article @gregnuckols.
McLaughlin pointed out a really good observation about the difference in bar path between novice and advanced lifters. He showed that both groups lower the bar using a similar pattern, almost a straight line, but the path changed dramatically during the ascent. Novice lifters move the bar straight UP THEN BACK, while advanced lifters do the opposite. They move the bar up AND BACK right off the bat and finish the lift by pressing almost in a straight line up.

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He pointed out that elite lifters were able to add pounds to their bench, with no real change in total force output. They achieved this by changing their bar path by shortening the moment arm, which is the distance from the bar to your shoulder in the frontal plane (from your armpit to an imaginary line that drops straight down from your hand at the point that you hold the bar). You can accomplish this by decreasing the distance between the bar and your shoulder faster during the ascent part of the lift. This doesn’t necessarily change the amount of work you are doing, but its simply a more efficient way to push.

In conclusion, McLaughlin noted in his research that elite lifters didn’t increase their maximum force output that much year after year, but the ones that continue making the most progress where the ones that make adjustments on their bar path.

Awesome drawing by @pheasyque

Dealing with Training Stress

Dealing with Training Stress

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Training Stress Explained by my good buddies over at @bros_md

The above graph shows fitness capacity on the y-axis and time on the x-axis.

It can represent a single workout or multiple workouts over time.

The general thought is that we all have a baseline fitness. Whenever we encounter a training stimulus, or stress, we drop below baseline due to fatigue.

Importantly, we physiologically respond very similar to training stress as other types of stress (not sleeping enough, cramming for exams, or making awkward eye contact with a stranger while eating a banana). So these types of stress can also cause negative deviations from baseline.

Once the training stress has stopped, or diminished, the recovery process begins. This mostly entails rest days, eating, and sleeping and is how we get back to, and beyond, the baseline.

Assuming an adequate training stimulus coupled with proper recovery, we can overshoot the baseline and make it to the land of gains.

These gains can ultimately establish a new baseline, but the cycle of accruing fatigue, followed by proper recovery, is crucial to continuing to make improvements in performance.

 

By: @bros_md

TUCKING ELBOWS WHEN SQUATTING

TUCKING ELBOWS WHEN SQUATTING

If you play @Steficohen’s squat videos with sound you’ll hear our teammates constantly yelling “ELBOWS!” Do you ever think about your elbows when you’re squatting? How to place them? What’s their role? How could they “damage” your squats?
Keeping your elbows neutral (down) is the best/safest way to squat: this because when you keep your elbows down, the bar’s load is evenly distributed perpendicularly on your body, placing most of the stress on your quads, decreasing the stress on your back as long as it’s being kept tight. You can also think about pushing the bar up with your hands as your elbows tuck down.
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Instead, flaring your elbows backwards will draw the load forward aswell in an anti-clockwise motion, decreasing the stress on your legs, while increasing the stress on your lower back for you not to fall forward.

Always keep an eye on your elbows and make sure you keep them down & not back. Sure, lots of people are very flexible and can keep the load evenly distributed even with their elbows backwards, but, that doesn’t apply to most of us!

 

SLOW SQUATS > FAST SQUATS: A Case for Successive Induction

SLOW SQUATS > FAST SQUATS: A Case for Successive Induction

Many of you might have read the title and been like “successive induc-what?”. Successive induction is a neurological principle I learned about during one of my neuroanatomy classes that peaked my interest because it is something I’ve been doing without knowing how powerful and effective it can be in strength training.

Successive induction is when you activate or engage an antagonist muscle to help the agonist develop more force and control. The agonist is the primary muscle used during a movement- in the case of a squat this will be your glutes and quads, the antagonist would be your hip flexors. An even easier example is doing a bicep curl- the biceps are the agonist, and the triceps are the antagonist. Now that you understand what SI is, lets talk about how you can use it to improve your strength.
Next time you squat, think about using your hip flexors to pull you down slowly into the pit instead of just dropping without control. Now you’re using the antagonists to help you generate more tension around your hips or what we call “co-contraction” which further increases the stability of the joint. You can apply this principle to the bench, bicep curls, or other accessory movements. You’ll notice that each successive rep gets easier and easier, and if you’re doing a single rep you’ll feel more stable.

Remember, one of the main components of strength training is our ability to develop tension. Successive induction is just one of many techniques you can use to make your nervous system even more efficient and functional.

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SLOW SQUATS > FAST SQUATS: a case for successive induction ______________________________________________ Many of you might have read the title and been like "successive induc-what?". Successive induction is a neurological principle I learned about during one of my neuroanatomy classes that peaked my interest because it is something I've been doing without knowing how powerful and effective it can be in strength training. _______________________________________________ Successive induction is when you activate or engage an antagonist muscle to help the agonist develop more force and control. The agonist is the primary muscle used during a movement- in the case of a squat this will be your glutes and quads, the antagonist would be your hip flexors. An even easier example is doing a bicep curl- the biceps are the agonist, and the triceps are the antagonist. Now that you understand what SI is, lets talk about how you can use it to improve your strength. _______________________________________________ Next time you squat, think about using your hip flexors to pull you down slowly into the pit instead of just dropping without control. Now you're using the antagonists to help you generate more tension around your hips or what we call "co-contraction" which further increases the stability of the joint. You can apply this principle to the bench, bicep curls, or other accessory movements. You’ll notice that each successive rep gets easier and easier, and if you’re doing a single rep you’ll feel more stable. _______________________________________________ Remember, one of the main components of strength training is our ability to develop tension. Successive induction is just one of many techniques you can use to make your nervous system even more efficient and functional.

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FRONT SQUAT vs BACK SQUAT

FRONT SQUAT vs BACK SQUAT

Both the Front Squat and the Back Squat are great movements. Selecting which movement to use depends on training goals, overall joint/muscle stiffness, and prior or current injuries.
Front squats have greater erector spinae involvement. This allows a more upright posture and reduced lumbar shear forces.

Back Squats have greater gluteal involvement, but higher lumbar shear force potential.

Front squat have lower compressive forces at the knee compared to the back squat.

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💥Front Squat vs Back Squat💥 – Both are great movements. Selecting which movement to use depends on training goals, overall joint/muscle stiffness, and prior or current injuries. – 📚Front squats have greater erector spinae involvement. This allows a more upright posture and reduced lumbar shear forces. – 📚Back Squats have greater gluteal involvement, but higher lumbar shear force potential. – 📚Front squat have lower compressive forces at the knee compared to the back squat. – Other consideration is sport specificity. Ex: powerlifters may gravitate toward back squats since it’s one of their competition lifts; and Olympic weightlifters may gravitate toward the front squat since that is the position that is required during the clean and jerk! – Written By @dr.giardina.dpt – Reference: https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/bc7c/48be4156f5f42b0add032b509c23c88681f6.pdf

A post shared by Dr. Stefanie Cohen, DPT ⚡️ (@steficohen) on

Other consideration is sport specificity. Ex: powerlifters may gravitate toward back squats since it’s one of their competition lifts; and Olympic weightlifters may gravitate toward the front squat since that is the position that is required during the clean and jerk!

Written By @dr.giardina.dpt –
Reference:

Click to access 48be4156f5f42b0add032b509c23c88681f6.pdf